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Hebt die titanic

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Im Wettlauf um die Macht schrecken die Supermächte vor nichts zurück. Die Zerreißprobe heißt Kalter Krieg. Für ein ausgeklügeltes Raketenabwehrsystem, das einen Atomkrieg unmöglich macht, benötigen amerikanische Wissenschaftler eine wertvolle. Hebt die Titanic ist ein US-amerikanischer Spielfilm aus dem Jahr , der trotz der hochkarätigen Besetzung ein finanzieller Misserfolg war. Der Film entstand. arosfestivalen.se - Kaufen Sie Hebt die Titanic günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer. Hebt die Titanic! | Cussler, Clive, Gronwald, Werner | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Spannender Science Fiction- und Spionageroman aus der Zeit des Kalten Kriegs​. Hebt die Titanic! Autor: Clive Cussler; Verlag.

hebt die titanic

Hebt die Titanic. Roman. [Cussler, Clive] on arosfestivalen.se *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Hebt die Titanic. Roman. Dirk Pitts größter Erfolg – und seine größte Niederlage! • Während der Kalte Krieg auf seinem Höhepunkt ist, entwickeln die USA die ultimative. Spannender Science Fiction- und Spionageroman aus der Zeit des Kalten Kriegs​. Hebt die Titanic! Autor: Clive Cussler; Verlag.

Denn die darin beschriebenen Methoden und Technologien sind ebenso an den Haaren herbei gezogen wie auch die Beschreibung des Wracks.

Desculpe, o registro do seu voto falhou. Tente novamente. Cussler sucht hier noch seinen Stil, aber ich finde gerade das spannend!

Wie jedes Buch von Clive Cussler eine fesselnde Story. Es ist spannend zulesen. Lieferzeit war im Rahmen.

Spannende Unterhaltung bis zum Schluss!!! Habe nichts anderes erwartet, und werde seine Buecher auch weiter mit Spannung geniessen.

Deswegen 5 sterne. Hab Ihn schon heruntergeladen. Start your review of Hebt Die Titanic! I think I was in high school when Kate Winslet stood on the bow of the Titanic and let Leonardo DiCaprio take her in his arms as their doomed love affair began onscreen.

I saw not only what the Titanic looked like from its final resting place on the bottom of the sea, but also James Cameron's lovingly crafted vision of the Titanic when she sailed on her maiden voyage.

This said, Clive Cussler's original imagining of the raising of the Titanic was breathtaking. It was not hard to believe in a wor I think I was in high school when Kate Winslet stood on the bow of the Titanic and let Leonardo DiCaprio take her in his arms as their doomed love affair began onscreen.

It was not hard to believe in a world where even her location on the sea floor was as yet undiscovered. The first discovery of debris from the ship elicited excitement, and the final cresting of her decks above the waves brought tears to my eyes.

Cussler gave us an amazing interconnected plot and the best crew in the world to undertake the salvaging of the most amazing ship in "Raise the Titanic!

My only caveat to my endorsement is this: The character of Dana Seagram could be completely removed from the book with no qualms from me.

She's a vision of what an independent working woman and wife would be like, and she is a disappointing, selfish, awful human being, much less, woman.

Thank goodness that Mr. Cussler has grown past this view of women in subsequent years. View 1 comment. Clive Cussler's novel "Raise the Titanic!

Written in , "Raise the Titanic! Rugged, taciturn, ex-Navy, knows a lot about boats. Also: charmer with the ladies, who don't really figure much in the book.

Women have three purposes: secretarial, sexual, or villainous. It's not that Cussler doesn't like women, it's just that he doesn't have a lot of things for them to do, and he's not quite sure what to do with the Clive Cussler's novel "Raise the Titanic!

It's not that Cussler doesn't like women, it's just that he doesn't have a lot of things for them to do, and he's not quite sure what to do with them when they're there.

Granted, this is Cussler in ' I'm sure he's evolved somewhat. I don't even like boats, and after the first 20 pages or so, I was ready to set sail into a hurricane on a dinghy and man the rigging.

I have no idea what I just wrote there… Seriously, I still don't have a clue what "port" or "starboard" mean, but it doesn't matter.

Cussler's vast knowledge of sea-faring only enhances the pleasure of reading this book, even for land-lubbers like myself.

The plot: a rare element known as byzanium is needed in a top-secret government project called The Sicilian Project. It just so happens that, in , a large amount of byzanium was crossing the Atlantic in the cargo hold of a deluxe cruise ship on its maiden voyage.

The ship was the Titanic. According to history, the ship hit an iceberg and sank, never to be found again, until Bill Paxton discovers it many decades later, with funding from James Cameron.

In a series of interesting and somewhat coincidental events, the Titanic is discovered, and a race ensues between the U.

Dirk Pitt, a courageous jack-of-all-trades and manly man, leads the expedition to retrieve the Titanic and raise it from its watery grave in order to secure the byzanium.

Little things like Soviet assassin spies, hurricanes, and naked women won't get in his way. Did I mention this book is a testosterone-laden manly Manfest?

There are some weird things about it. One is that it was published in '76, but it takes place in the "present" of I'm not sure why Cussler chose to set it in a near future, although I'm sure the fact that the technology for underwater retrieval needed for raising a ship like the Titanic probably wasn't around in '76, or it was still in its early stages.

In any case, the setting threw me off a bit. Interestingly enough, the socio-political issues Cussler writes about in his future aren't that completely far off from the real Another weird thing is that, at the time, the Titanic had not been discovered.

I can't recall exactly when it was discovered, although I'm pretty sure it was in the early '80s, because I was in elementary school at the time and remember it being in the news.

I was fairly certain that scientists would discover that it was full of underwater alien eggs, and that they would hatch and multiply and eventually eat everyone in the world.

I think the movie "Alien" scarred my childhood. I curse my father for letting me stay up late and watch that damn movie… Anyway, interesting to note that Cussler kind of predicted the discovery of the Titanic.

Overall, I was pretty taken in by "Raise the Titanic! And some sexy ladies, of course. View all 4 comments.

The cover blurb really, is not fibbing when it gleefully informs you that this is "Dirk Pitt's greatest adventure!

Its a one-of-a-kind conception. A unique reading experience in the annals of all paperback thrillers past, present, and future.

It's surprising to realize that this is chronologically not the first 'Dirk Pitt' novel. But its certainly the one which brought his author, Clive Cussler, international fame.

Simply stated, Cussler "knocks the ball out of the park" wi The cover blurb really, is not fibbing when it gleefully informs you that this is "Dirk Pitt's greatest adventure!

Simply stated, Cussler "knocks the ball out of the park" with this one. I can't recall when a thriller author has ever made such a debut in his first books.

Maybe Frederick Forsythe? But that was well before my time. Now, as much as I heap scorn on most of the later episodes in the 'Dirk Pitt' story--the unending stream of hackneyed dross which Cussler insists on shoveling into our faces--this is one book where his own lordly opinion of himself, is fully warranted.

Sadly, quality quickly peters out after this one--the whole series only has books worth glancing at.

Cussler's career is one of the grossest examples of a writer 'going downhill' in modern times. Worse than Robert Ludlum in that regard.

But in this early effort--Cussler shines. I vividly remember the thrill of just holding that glossy, colorful bookcover in my hands, as he spun his astounding tale.

With that cover-art which literally no other book has-ever-had-before, or will-ever-have-again.

The massive, spooky afterdeck of the HMS Titanic looming up through the fog and mist. And a story which took readers into a literary region covered by no other novel: espionage mixed with sea-salvage.

Its iconic, that paperback cover--audacious, just as is the novel's plot itself. That plot--briefly--is this: the intelligence services of three nations reluctantly realize that the lost-since- Titanic was carrying a super-secret scientific discovery in its vault.

This 'macguffin' is 'Beryllium ', a mineral to make sophisticated new weapons with; a mineral to tip-the-balance-of-global-power-for-whatever-nation-can-recover-it-first; a mineral ore to kill for.

It necessitates first the outlandishly difficult pinpointing of--then, a complicated extrication process upon the doomed ship itself via giant sacs of air , just to even wrest the secret cargo from its abyssal trench.

Down, down, down Cussler is never better than when detailing such fiendishly technical undersea operations. It is a tense sequence here, described with genuine storytelling magic.

But this is his forte'. It's what he knows best. Later, when the ship surges up to the surface--there are helicopters and machine guns; ultimatums, standoffs, sabotage, spies; commandos.

Clever twists and turns. And then suddenly there's a brilliantly-written scene where everyone--including you--will hold your breath as a gorgeous, leggy brunette strips off her clothes and proudly displays her naked figure no cries of sexism here, please.

Anyway, what next? Well, I don't rightly know how to describe it but control of the ship goes in the Yanks' favor and then--the ghost ship, with all its lost souls--is impossibly, towed into New York harbor!!!

It's true, I am not even kidding. Can you stand it? I can't friggin' stand it, can you? Greeted by a small-boat armada, crowds lining the docks, claxons and foghorns blaring, fireboats sheeting the air.

Right up the Hudson It makes you want to leap atop the arms of your chair and roar! Boy, let me tell you what: if this does not make your heart race, or put mist in your eyes--find a defibrillator asap, because you have no pulse.

Now, the thing about this novel worth remembering is that 'Titanic-mania' was not always ready-to-hand in our society.

It was once a sleeping giant. There was a time when there were no Discovery Channel specials on the topic; and when the public imagination was completely somnolent as to the whole legend.

Decades had passed without anyone sparing more than an occasional fleeting thought to the dusty, historic, chestnut that it truly was.

Then this book came along, and blew everyone away. So, if anyone today tells you they've been a 'Titanic fan all their life' , they're probably fibbing unless they admit the stark, caught-us-unaware paperback market upheaval that this book caused for everyone.

It came out of nowhere. Cussler and David ' First Blood ' Morrell together, coined the modern action-thriller book genre. The crazy 'Titanic' plot here, introduced readers as well, to an action-figure with an excessively macho and unlikely name.

Pitt was 'new', in that we had never seen him before--but old, as in familiar-as-James Bond. Pitt is athletic; hardy; shrewd; and full of quips, as Bond always was.

Cussler doesn't break-any-molds with this beefcake. The problem is rather that he never stops re-using that mold..

I've lost count. Even the most discriminating reader of thrillers would be hard put to find a single flaw in this fast-paced book regardless of how bored we are to become with Pitt in subsequent outings.

This one tale, really does offer everything; and its all managed very ably and well. Pacing, editing, technical details, are all in perfect balance.

A delight. As a one-off read, it stands alone and shoulder-to-shoulder with any other single title in its genre. It represents everything that is great in the thriller-genre itself.

Its bittersweet now to reflect upon all of this, of course. Can you imagine how fantastic it would have been, had Cussler written more novels as cracking good as this one?

But he didn't. That dynamic, 'promise-rich' cover-art doesn't evoke at all, what the bombastic Cussler's follow-through brought to the publishing industry.

His later career puts the 'lack' in 'lackluster' although I'm sure he thought otherwise. But he's wrong. Unfortunately, he wound up spearheading nothing; he barged into our cabin, broke down the door only to crash through the flooring and sink like a stone.

His mediocre books litter the floor of the thriller genre like the ships he has so long written about--while he laughs all the way to the bank.

Ah Cussler Why couldn't you be straight with us? Was there ever a one-trick-pony that sired so many bastards as you?

No, you're not King Poseidon.. You copycatted yourself! Shelves: action-adventure-thriller. I decided to read a Dirk Pitt book after noticing that Sahara , a Matthew McConaughy movie I enjoyed a while back, was based on a literary character.

I decided to read this book instead of Sahara since I was not familiar with the specific story, but was familiar with the ship.

As for this book, it was interesting although beyond unrealistic at times. It was fairly well written, although I would not call it spellbinding.

I did have a few specific gripes with the book spoilers follow : - Although it I decided to read a Dirk Pitt book after noticing that Sahara , a Matthew McConaughy movie I enjoyed a while back, was based on a literary character.

I did have a few specific gripes with the book spoilers follow : - Although it is a Dirk Pitt adventure, Dirk's character only appears in one paragraph in the first pages.

This left me feeling misled by the "Dirk Pitt Adventure" stamp on the cover of the book, although the first pages were interesting, regardless.

I know this was written in the 's, but it was seriously cringe-worthy. Even the Russian villain is given a reprieve at the end, but the heroic scientist that saves America loses both his wife and his mind.

Not even after Dirk finally finds the macguffin, or when the Sicilian Defense actually works and saves the country, is he revisited.

I found this oddly unsatisfying for this type of book. I am now debating whether to pick up another Dirk Pitt book and give it a shot, hoping the flaws I found were specific to this book and not to Clive Cussler.

View all 3 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

Each time I'm tempted to laugh at Cussler, I remind myself that back in '75, Titanic wasn't the world's most over-exposed shipwreck that would happen ten years later.

My knowledge of reality vs, Cussler's assumptions aside, this yarn goes well enough until, for some reason, Cussler seems to lose his mind.

He discards a character he's gotten us to invest ourselves in, insures the happiness of one he hasn't, and generally lets the whole thing take a turn downhill.

At the end of the novel, I'm le Each time I'm tempted to laugh at Cussler, I remind myself that back in '75, Titanic wasn't the world's most over-exposed shipwreck that would happen ten years later.

At the end of the novel, I'm left wondering: why? For the love of heaven, why? I think I have an answer.

Cussler is attempting to have his cake and eat it, too. He wants his hero, note his, not the book's: the hero of this book is Gene Seagram, at least until Cussler pulls the rug out from under him to be both a man of mystery and the guy everybody loves.

The problem with this is, aside from the fact that it will not work—a man of mystery is too remote to be liked, a man who's liked is too well known to be mysterious— is that he's already gotten us to liking Gene Seagram.

I think at some point Cussler realizes this and decides to cuckold Seagram, both plot-wise and literally, with Pitt. In the process, Cussler destroys a marriage he's had the reader this reader, anyway hoping would make it, sends a man who's sacrificed everything for his country to bedlam, and then packs Pitt off to prove the salvage operation that cost both lives, credulity, and a whopping amount of taxpayer money wasn't necessary in the first place, which would have worked if Titanic had been lost again, but as-is makes no real sense whatsoever.

I point out that salvaging Titanic was Seagram's idea, and once again Pitt proves what a loser he is. The only conclusion I can come to is we're supposed to end the book beaming, saying "That Pitt—whatta guy!

The funny thing is, Cussler can write when he wants to. The scene of Gene Seagram's near suicide is a nice piece, maybe the best scene in the entire book although a few of Seagram's other scenes rival it.

Of course, it turns out to be useless, since Gene doesn't accomplish a darned thing after that, and then loses his wife and goes crackers to boot.

After the lovely advice he gets from Pitt, who can blame him? A bedside manner our ubermench has not. In conclusion: interesting concept, well-done up to a point, then completely goes to hell for obscure reasons best known to the author, although I suspect it's more a burning need to have Pitt be the Best than some half-assed idea that Titanic is cursed.

All I'm left deciding is whether or not to read another outing of the Pittster. I'll have to sleep on it. I needed to finish off my evening reading last night with some mental chewing gum and this is what I picked off my shelves.

So far so good and easy on the brain after Dostoevski and Sterne. The dialogue is at best functional, but the plot is all in a book like this anyway, and it's a page-turner so far.

The Colorado stuff is appealing. Moving right along with this engro I needed to finish off my evening reading last night with some mental chewing gum and this is what I picked off my shelves.

Moving right along with this engrossing read. I am undeterred by the ridiculously dated sexist take on women in this book. Other Goodreads reviewers have commented on it.

Makes me shake my head and laugh and move on. It's or was Mile High Stadium. The iceberg did NOT rip a lateral hole in the hull of the Titanic.

It buckled the hull plates, which caused water to come rushing in along the buckled area. Didn't do much book reading last night between listening to football and perusing a bunch of magazines.

One thing did become clear, however, and that is that other mostly female G'reads reviewers have it right when they cite the author for his relentless, gratuitous male chauvinist piggery.

The relentless women-as-sexual-objects thing is in fact rather striking. Also quite dated Moving along now as the BIG project is underway with as many serious complications as CC can toss into the pot.

Seems unlikely that Pitt would be told to back off on pursuing the Russian saboteurs, but what do I know. This IS fiction. BTW the back illustration now makes sense - sort of - but there's still no reason why the hull plates above the water line along the "gash" should be depicted curled outward.

Anyway, we now know that there was no gash in real life. Also, of course, we now know that the ship went down and settled in two pieces, not one, which CC didn't know when he wrote this.

I visited those places on a bicycle trip back in the summer of Train from London to Exeter and bicycle to Plymouth. Very scenic indeed!

Finished up last night with a whirlwind of well-written if implausible action stuff. Perfectly logical if you think about it.

Shades of "The Nine Tailors"! A dead giveaway of bad writing. I've always been a fan of the Dirk Pitt novels. I read them when I was in my 20's and loved them.

Back then, I would have given all of them 5 stars. Now that I've read far more books in a lot of different genres, I'm more critical.

I'm re-reading through these novels, and up to this one have been a bit more disappointed than I am with 4.

I remember liking this one a lot more than the others 20 years ago as well. The plotting is more intricate, and Pitt's character is more developed, showing a s I've always been a fan of the Dirk Pitt novels.

The plotting is more intricate, and Pitt's character is more developed, showing a side that he hasn't in the first 3 books. The subject matter, the Titanic, is well researched and presented well for the time it was written.

We know more now, of course, which dates some aspects of this book. But a great story, and well worth reading for any Cussler fan.

The book that broke Clive Cussler out. One thing I constantly teach is that title is the 1 marketing tool you have control over as an author.

RIP Clive. Going way back in time and reading some of his earlier books that I never read. Not as good as his later books by far I would rate this more of a 2.

I guess he improved his writing as the years went by Thoroughly convinced that Clive Cussler has never actually met a real woman before.

This was my first taste of Clive Cussler. I read this in as a fourteen year old. I choose this one first because it was about the Titanic and I love Titanic stuff after I finished this I read everything by him in a month, my father was very proud of me and we had the most wonderful discussions on every book.

I've traveled to many places in many time lines due to the historical incidents which are the catalyst for the adventure stories he writes about.

Even talking about a Dirk Pitt adventure is exciting. The film of this,is just too awful to watch, unlike Sahara, I think they done a great job with that and was well cast but only because M.

McC is a major Dirk Pitt Fan which is totally understandable. Don't fix it! Context is everything He might have thought he was crafting a strong female character, must he was sexist through and through in attempting it.

Think 20 something male and a culture of Hugh Hefner in the 70s with an underwater James Bond who never fails to get the girl, even in the most remote environments and you'll get the picture.

As this was just his third novel, Cussler had yet to perfect his maddening habit of having Context is everything As this was just his third novel, Cussler had yet to perfect his maddening habit of having his characters voice the things that most people would just think to themselves, but the seeds were here.

I must not have noticed thirty years ago that he called the military head of the Navy the "Navy Chief of Staff" - it's "Chief of Naval Operations" Despite his characters being caricatures and his plots formulaic, for whatever reason, I like his books.

I still have a fascination with Titanic , due in some part to this book.

Dirk Pitts größter Erfolg – und seine größte Niederlage! • Während der Kalte Krieg auf seinem Höhepunkt ist, entwickeln die USA die ultimative. Hebt die Titanic. Roman. [Cussler, Clive] on arosfestivalen.se *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Hebt die Titanic. Roman. Hebt die Titanic ein Film von Jerry Jameson mit Jason Robards, Richard Jordan. Inhaltsangabe: Um seltenes Mineral sicherzustellen, wagt sich ein Projekt auf. Inhaltsangabe zu "Hebt die Titanic". Als Cussler den Roman schrieb, war das Wrack der Titanic noch nicht entdeckt. Das Kernelement Byzanium, das sich im. »Falls das gefundene Instrument tatsächlich ein Indiz ist, dann liegt die Titanic nicht dort, wo man sie vermutet.«Gunn griff nach einem Filzstift und tupfte eine. Brennendes Wasser. Mehr von Clive Cussler. Geheimakte Odessa Autor: Clive Cussler. Nicht ausfüllen! Ich habe oft den Faden verloren und den Zusammenhang nicht diagnose 9 bettys staffel 5 folge verstanden. Sprache Deutsch.

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Masse Breite mm, Höhe mm. Source ich haben. Ähnliche Bücher source noch mehr Lesestunden. Da tritt auch Dirk Pitt in Aktion mit seinem Humor und taten. Die ganze Homeland staffel 5 schauen ist spannend und actionreich aufgebaut, hat ein paar rasante Wendungen und einen sehr link Schluss. Ja, was kann man zu dem Buch sagen. hebt die titanic

Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery.

Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. To obtain a supply of a rare mineral, a ship raising operation is conducted for the only known source, the R.

Director: Jerry Jameson. Available on Amazon. Added to Watchlist. Titanic Films. Favoritest Movies of Use the HTML below.

You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Jason Robards Admiral James Sandecker Richard Jordan Dirk Pitt David Selby Gene Seagram Anne Archer Dana Archibald Alec Guinness John Bigalow Bo Brundin Captain Prevlov M.

Emmet Walsh Master Chief Vinnie Walker J. Captain Joe Burke Norman Bartold Admiral Kemper Elya Baskin Marganin Dirk Blocker Merker Robert Broyles Willis Paul Carr Bohannon Harvey Lewis Learn more More Like This.

Titanic Drama History Romance. A Night to Remember Biography Drama History. Titanic TV Movie Drama History.

Action Drama History. Stars: Peter Gallagher, George C. Scott, Catherine Zeta-Jones. Titanic II Video Action Adventure Drama.

The Hindenburg Adventure Drama History. Stars: George C. Scott, Anne Bancroft, William Atherton. Megaforce Action Sci-Fi.

Saving the Titanic TV Movie Sci-Fi Thriller. The Big Bus Action Comedy. Edit Storyline A group of Americans are interested in raising the ill-fated ocean liner R.

Taglines: They've found the Titanic. There's just one thing left to do Edit Did You Know? I have noticed that some of the older readers have had problems especially the ones on Android tablets.

My original Kindle lasted over 7 years but I went through 2 Kindle Fire tablets in 3 years because of the Android program. I hope this helps.

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Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Hebt Die Titanic! I think I was in high school when Kate Winslet stood on the bow of the Titanic and let Leonardo DiCaprio take her in his arms as their doomed love affair began onscreen.

I saw not only what the Titanic looked like from its final resting place on the bottom of the sea, but also James Cameron's lovingly crafted vision of the Titanic when she sailed on her maiden voyage.

This said, Clive Cussler's original imagining of the raising of the Titanic was breathtaking. It was not hard to believe in a wor I think I was in high school when Kate Winslet stood on the bow of the Titanic and let Leonardo DiCaprio take her in his arms as their doomed love affair began onscreen.

It was not hard to believe in a world where even her location on the sea floor was as yet undiscovered. The first discovery of debris from the ship elicited excitement, and the final cresting of her decks above the waves brought tears to my eyes.

Cussler gave us an amazing interconnected plot and the best crew in the world to undertake the salvaging of the most amazing ship in "Raise the Titanic!

My only caveat to my endorsement is this: The character of Dana Seagram could be completely removed from the book with no qualms from me.

She's a vision of what an independent working woman and wife would be like, and she is a disappointing, selfish, awful human being, much less, woman.

Thank goodness that Mr. Cussler has grown past this view of women in subsequent years. View 1 comment. Clive Cussler's novel "Raise the Titanic!

Written in , "Raise the Titanic! Rugged, taciturn, ex-Navy, knows a lot about boats. Also: charmer with the ladies, who don't really figure much in the book.

Women have three purposes: secretarial, sexual, or villainous. It's not that Cussler doesn't like women, it's just that he doesn't have a lot of things for them to do, and he's not quite sure what to do with the Clive Cussler's novel "Raise the Titanic!

It's not that Cussler doesn't like women, it's just that he doesn't have a lot of things for them to do, and he's not quite sure what to do with them when they're there.

Granted, this is Cussler in ' I'm sure he's evolved somewhat. I don't even like boats, and after the first 20 pages or so, I was ready to set sail into a hurricane on a dinghy and man the rigging.

I have no idea what I just wrote there… Seriously, I still don't have a clue what "port" or "starboard" mean, but it doesn't matter.

Cussler's vast knowledge of sea-faring only enhances the pleasure of reading this book, even for land-lubbers like myself.

The plot: a rare element known as byzanium is needed in a top-secret government project called The Sicilian Project.

It just so happens that, in , a large amount of byzanium was crossing the Atlantic in the cargo hold of a deluxe cruise ship on its maiden voyage.

The ship was the Titanic. According to history, the ship hit an iceberg and sank, never to be found again, until Bill Paxton discovers it many decades later, with funding from James Cameron.

In a series of interesting and somewhat coincidental events, the Titanic is discovered, and a race ensues between the U.

Dirk Pitt, a courageous jack-of-all-trades and manly man, leads the expedition to retrieve the Titanic and raise it from its watery grave in order to secure the byzanium.

Little things like Soviet assassin spies, hurricanes, and naked women won't get in his way. Did I mention this book is a testosterone-laden manly Manfest?

There are some weird things about it. One is that it was published in '76, but it takes place in the "present" of I'm not sure why Cussler chose to set it in a near future, although I'm sure the fact that the technology for underwater retrieval needed for raising a ship like the Titanic probably wasn't around in '76, or it was still in its early stages.

In any case, the setting threw me off a bit. Interestingly enough, the socio-political issues Cussler writes about in his future aren't that completely far off from the real Another weird thing is that, at the time, the Titanic had not been discovered.

I can't recall exactly when it was discovered, although I'm pretty sure it was in the early '80s, because I was in elementary school at the time and remember it being in the news.

I was fairly certain that scientists would discover that it was full of underwater alien eggs, and that they would hatch and multiply and eventually eat everyone in the world.

I think the movie "Alien" scarred my childhood. I curse my father for letting me stay up late and watch that damn movie… Anyway, interesting to note that Cussler kind of predicted the discovery of the Titanic.

Overall, I was pretty taken in by "Raise the Titanic! And some sexy ladies, of course. View all 4 comments.

The cover blurb really, is not fibbing when it gleefully informs you that this is "Dirk Pitt's greatest adventure! Its a one-of-a-kind conception.

A unique reading experience in the annals of all paperback thrillers past, present, and future. It's surprising to realize that this is chronologically not the first 'Dirk Pitt' novel.

But its certainly the one which brought his author, Clive Cussler, international fame. Simply stated, Cussler "knocks the ball out of the park" wi The cover blurb really, is not fibbing when it gleefully informs you that this is "Dirk Pitt's greatest adventure!

Simply stated, Cussler "knocks the ball out of the park" with this one. I can't recall when a thriller author has ever made such a debut in his first books.

Maybe Frederick Forsythe? But that was well before my time. Now, as much as I heap scorn on most of the later episodes in the 'Dirk Pitt' story--the unending stream of hackneyed dross which Cussler insists on shoveling into our faces--this is one book where his own lordly opinion of himself, is fully warranted.

Sadly, quality quickly peters out after this one--the whole series only has books worth glancing at.

Cussler's career is one of the grossest examples of a writer 'going downhill' in modern times. Worse than Robert Ludlum in that regard.

But in this early effort--Cussler shines. I vividly remember the thrill of just holding that glossy, colorful bookcover in my hands, as he spun his astounding tale.

With that cover-art which literally no other book has-ever-had-before, or will-ever-have-again.

The massive, spooky afterdeck of the HMS Titanic looming up through the fog and mist. And a story which took readers into a literary region covered by no other novel: espionage mixed with sea-salvage.

Its iconic, that paperback cover--audacious, just as is the novel's plot itself. That plot--briefly--is this: the intelligence services of three nations reluctantly realize that the lost-since- Titanic was carrying a super-secret scientific discovery in its vault.

This 'macguffin' is 'Beryllium ', a mineral to make sophisticated new weapons with; a mineral to tip-the-balance-of-global-power-for-whatever-nation-can-recover-it-first; a mineral ore to kill for.

It necessitates first the outlandishly difficult pinpointing of--then, a complicated extrication process upon the doomed ship itself via giant sacs of air , just to even wrest the secret cargo from its abyssal trench.

Down, down, down Cussler is never better than when detailing such fiendishly technical undersea operations. It is a tense sequence here, described with genuine storytelling magic.

But this is his forte'. It's what he knows best. Later, when the ship surges up to the surface--there are helicopters and machine guns; ultimatums, standoffs, sabotage, spies; commandos.

Clever twists and turns. And then suddenly there's a brilliantly-written scene where everyone--including you--will hold your breath as a gorgeous, leggy brunette strips off her clothes and proudly displays her naked figure no cries of sexism here, please.

Anyway, what next? Well, I don't rightly know how to describe it but control of the ship goes in the Yanks' favor and then--the ghost ship, with all its lost souls--is impossibly, towed into New York harbor!!!

It's true, I am not even kidding. Can you stand it? I can't friggin' stand it, can you? Greeted by a small-boat armada, crowds lining the docks, claxons and foghorns blaring, fireboats sheeting the air.

Right up the Hudson It makes you want to leap atop the arms of your chair and roar! Boy, let me tell you what: if this does not make your heart race, or put mist in your eyes--find a defibrillator asap, because you have no pulse.

Now, the thing about this novel worth remembering is that 'Titanic-mania' was not always ready-to-hand in our society. It was once a sleeping giant.

There was a time when there were no Discovery Channel specials on the topic; and when the public imagination was completely somnolent as to the whole legend.

Decades had passed without anyone sparing more than an occasional fleeting thought to the dusty, historic, chestnut that it truly was.

Then this book came along, and blew everyone away. So, if anyone today tells you they've been a 'Titanic fan all their life' , they're probably fibbing unless they admit the stark, caught-us-unaware paperback market upheaval that this book caused for everyone.

It came out of nowhere. Cussler and David ' First Blood ' Morrell together, coined the modern action-thriller book genre.

The crazy 'Titanic' plot here, introduced readers as well, to an action-figure with an excessively macho and unlikely name.

Pitt was 'new', in that we had never seen him before--but old, as in familiar-as-James Bond. Pitt is athletic; hardy; shrewd; and full of quips, as Bond always was.

Cussler doesn't break-any-molds with this beefcake. The problem is rather that he never stops re-using that mold..

I've lost count. Even the most discriminating reader of thrillers would be hard put to find a single flaw in this fast-paced book regardless of how bored we are to become with Pitt in subsequent outings.

This one tale, really does offer everything; and its all managed very ably and well. Pacing, editing, technical details, are all in perfect balance.

A delight. As a one-off read, it stands alone and shoulder-to-shoulder with any other single title in its genre. It represents everything that is great in the thriller-genre itself.

Its bittersweet now to reflect upon all of this, of course. Can you imagine how fantastic it would have been, had Cussler written more novels as cracking good as this one?

But he didn't. That dynamic, 'promise-rich' cover-art doesn't evoke at all, what the bombastic Cussler's follow-through brought to the publishing industry.

His later career puts the 'lack' in 'lackluster' although I'm sure he thought otherwise. But he's wrong. Unfortunately, he wound up spearheading nothing; he barged into our cabin, broke down the door only to crash through the flooring and sink like a stone.

His mediocre books litter the floor of the thriller genre like the ships he has so long written about--while he laughs all the way to the bank.

Ah Cussler Why couldn't you be straight with us? Was there ever a one-trick-pony that sired so many bastards as you? No, you're not King Poseidon..

You copycatted yourself! Shelves: action-adventure-thriller. I decided to read a Dirk Pitt book after noticing that Sahara , a Matthew McConaughy movie I enjoyed a while back, was based on a literary character.

I decided to read this book instead of Sahara since I was not familiar with the specific story, but was familiar with the ship.

As for this book, it was interesting although beyond unrealistic at times. It was fairly well written, although I would not call it spellbinding.

I did have a few specific gripes with the book spoilers follow : - Although it I decided to read a Dirk Pitt book after noticing that Sahara , a Matthew McConaughy movie I enjoyed a while back, was based on a literary character.

I did have a few specific gripes with the book spoilers follow : - Although it is a Dirk Pitt adventure, Dirk's character only appears in one paragraph in the first pages.

This left me feeling misled by the "Dirk Pitt Adventure" stamp on the cover of the book, although the first pages were interesting, regardless.

I know this was written in the 's, but it was seriously cringe-worthy. Even the Russian villain is given a reprieve at the end, but the heroic scientist that saves America loses both his wife and his mind.

Not even after Dirk finally finds the macguffin, or when the Sicilian Defense actually works and saves the country, is he revisited. I found this oddly unsatisfying for this type of book.

I am now debating whether to pick up another Dirk Pitt book and give it a shot, hoping the flaws I found were specific to this book and not to Clive Cussler.

View all 3 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Each time I'm tempted to laugh at Cussler, I remind myself that back in '75, Titanic wasn't the world's most over-exposed shipwreck that would happen ten years later.

My knowledge of reality vs, Cussler's assumptions aside, this yarn goes well enough until, for some reason, Cussler seems to lose his mind.

He discards a character he's gotten us to invest ourselves in, insures the happiness of one he hasn't, and generally lets the whole thing take a turn downhill.

At the end of the novel, I'm le Each time I'm tempted to laugh at Cussler, I remind myself that back in '75, Titanic wasn't the world's most over-exposed shipwreck that would happen ten years later.

At the end of the novel, I'm left wondering: why? For the love of heaven, why? I think I have an answer. Cussler is attempting to have his cake and eat it, too.

He wants his hero, note his, not the book's: the hero of this book is Gene Seagram, at least until Cussler pulls the rug out from under him to be both a man of mystery and the guy everybody loves.

The problem with this is, aside from the fact that it will not work—a man of mystery is too remote to be liked, a man who's liked is too well known to be mysterious— is that he's already gotten us to liking Gene Seagram.

I think at some point Cussler realizes this and decides to cuckold Seagram, both plot-wise and literally, with Pitt.

In the process, Cussler destroys a marriage he's had the reader this reader, anyway hoping would make it, sends a man who's sacrificed everything for his country to bedlam, and then packs Pitt off to prove the salvage operation that cost both lives, credulity, and a whopping amount of taxpayer money wasn't necessary in the first place, which would have worked if Titanic had been lost again, but as-is makes no real sense whatsoever.

I point out that salvaging Titanic was Seagram's idea, and once again Pitt proves what a loser he is.

The only conclusion I can come to is we're supposed to end the book beaming, saying "That Pitt—whatta guy! The funny thing is, Cussler can write when he wants to.

The scene of Gene Seagram's near suicide is a nice piece, maybe the best scene in the entire book although a few of Seagram's other scenes rival it.

Of course, it turns out to be useless, since Gene doesn't accomplish a darned thing after that, and then loses his wife and goes crackers to boot.

After the lovely advice he gets from Pitt, who can blame him? A bedside manner our ubermench has not. In conclusion: interesting concept, well-done up to a point, then completely goes to hell for obscure reasons best known to the author, although I suspect it's more a burning need to have Pitt be the Best than some half-assed idea that Titanic is cursed.

All I'm left deciding is whether or not to read another outing of the Pittster. I'll have to sleep on it. I needed to finish off my evening reading last night with some mental chewing gum and this is what I picked off my shelves.

So far so good and easy on the brain after Dostoevski and Sterne. The dialogue is at best functional, but the plot is all in a book like this anyway, and it's a page-turner so far.

The Colorado stuff is appealing. Moving right along with this engro I needed to finish off my evening reading last night with some mental chewing gum and this is what I picked off my shelves.

Moving right along with this engrossing read. I am undeterred by the ridiculously dated sexist take on women in this book. Other Goodreads reviewers have commented on it.

Makes me shake my head and laugh and move on. It's or was Mile High Stadium. The iceberg did NOT rip a lateral hole in the hull of the Titanic.

It buckled the hull plates, which caused water to come rushing in along the buckled area. Didn't do much book reading last night between listening to football and perusing a bunch of magazines.

One thing did become clear, however, and that is that other mostly female G'reads reviewers have it right when they cite the author for his relentless, gratuitous male chauvinist piggery.

The relentless women-as-sexual-objects thing is in fact rather striking. Also quite dated Moving along now as the BIG project is underway with as many serious complications as CC can toss into the pot.

Seems unlikely that Pitt would be told to back off on pursuing the Russian saboteurs, but what do I know.

This IS fiction. BTW the back illustration now makes sense - sort of - but there's still no reason why the hull plates above the water line along the "gash" should be depicted curled outward.

Anyway, we now know that there was no gash in real life. Also, of course, we now know that the ship went down and settled in two pieces, not one, which CC didn't know when he wrote this.

I visited those places on a bicycle trip back in the summer of Train from London to Exeter and bicycle to Plymouth.

Very scenic indeed! Finished up last night with a whirlwind of well-written if implausible action stuff. Perfectly logical if you think about it.

Shades of "The Nine Tailors"! A dead giveaway of bad writing. I've always been a fan of the Dirk Pitt novels.

I read them when I was in my 20's and loved them. Back then, I would have given all of them 5 stars.

Now that I've read far more books in a lot of different genres, I'm more critical. I'm re-reading through these novels, and up to this one have been a bit more disappointed than I am with 4.

I remember liking this one a lot more than the others 20 years ago as well. The plotting is more intricate, and Pitt's character is more developed, showing a s I've always been a fan of the Dirk Pitt novels.

The plotting is more intricate, and Pitt's character is more developed, showing a side that he hasn't in the first 3 books. The subject matter, the Titanic, is well researched and presented well for the time it was written.

We know more now, of course, which dates some aspects of this book. But a great story, and well worth reading for any Cussler fan.

The book that broke Clive Cussler out. One thing I constantly teach is that title is the 1 marketing tool you have control over as an author.

RIP Clive. Going way back in time and reading some of his earlier books that I never read. Not as good as his later books by far I would rate this more of a 2.

I guess he improved his writing as the years went by Thoroughly convinced that Clive Cussler has never actually met a real woman before.

This was my first taste of Clive Cussler. I read this in as a fourteen year old. I choose this one first because it was about the Titanic and I love Titanic stuff after I finished this I read everything by him in a month, my father was very proud of me and we had the most wonderful discussions on every book.

I've traveled to many places in many time lines due to the historical incidents which are the catalyst for the adventure stories he writes about.

Rezension here "Hebt die Titanic" von Clive Cussler. Verlag Blanvalet. Sie wollen nichts mehr verpassen? Fast zu wenig Pitt dabei, sonst wieder spannend wie immer und diesmal mit einer tollen Kulisse. Leonetti Schnitt Robert F. Das würde es derart so heute nicht mehr geben, aber zum Zeitpunkt der Erstauflage des Buches, war es noch so. Da tritt auch Dirk Pitt in Aktion mit link ganz eigenen Art. Die Black the new orange staffel is neue zu diesem Film fanden zu einer Zeit statt, als das Wrack der Titanic noch unentdeckt am Grund des Nordatlantiks lag, was zu Spekulationen Veranlassung gab, dass der ehemalige Stolz der White Star Line im Hinblick auf die Meerestiefe und den dort geringen Sauerstoffgehalt noch in gutem Zustand sein könnte. Rezensionen und Bewertungen Neu. More info Jameson. Verdrehte Tatsachen, aber trotzdem glaubwürdig und unheimlich spannend. In den Warenkorb. Auch die Russen sind dank californication stream gut funktionierenden Geheimdienstes bald an Ort und Stelle. Der Schreibstil konnte auch hier wieder überzeugen allerdings gibt es vom Not champions league zdf opinion definitiv bessere stories. Können Go here mir bitte einen gefallen tun und mir das Ende aufschreiben. Bestellen bei:. Natürlich ist Dirk zum 2. Auf Grundlage dieses Kenntnisstandes ist es im Film daher möglich, die Titanic in einem Stück zu bergen. Ich bin noch dabei. Hebt die Titanic! Spannend inszeniert Cussler hier ein politisches Intrigenspiel, bei dessen Gerangel das wohl bekannteste Schiffswrack der Welt gesucht companeros zwei die Titanic. Eisberg Autor: Clive Cussler. Nach kurzer Prüfung wird diese von unserer Online-Redaktion freigeschaltet. Once upon a kinox did write a solid main plot, but the biggest problems were link of the subplots which undermined the work plus some poor decisions around Pitt close to the end. Amazon Music Stream millions of songs. I think the movie "Alien" scarred my childhood. If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through link support? Cussler was an internationally recognized authority on shipwrecks and the founder of the National Underwater and 2019 schlagerchampions Agency, NUMA a C3 non-profit organization named after the fictional Federal agency in his novels that dedicates itself to preserving American maritime and naval history.

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